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Bartender Dave Whitton of DTLA’s Prank bar developed this yummy recipe for the new book ’The Art of Cooking with Cannabis’.

When it comes to cannabis consumption, we’ve come a long way. Legalization has helped us graduate from surreptitiously smoking out of makeshift pipes carved from apples to nibbling on apple-flavored gourmet edibles we had delivered to our doorsteps. A lot of that has to do with changing attitudes and a fresh understanding of cannabis’ health benefits.

“I was frequently coming across articles highlighting the wellness properties of cannabis,” says food writer and cookbook developer Tracey Medeiros. “The Hemp Farming Act of 2018 reclassified hemp with less than 0.3 percent THC from a controlled substance to an ordinary agricultural product. This piqued my interest and caused me to begin researching the many culinary uses of cannabis.”

– Read the entire article at Los Angeles Magazine.

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Every week it seems another celebrity announces the launch of a new cannabis brand. What started with Snoop Dogg and Willie Nelson in 2015 has gone mainstream; Magic Johnson and Jane Fonda are CBD brand ambassadors now. With the continuing passage of legalization in states across the nation, more such brands will hit the market.

One element of the Green Rush which has been problematic is lack of diversity in ownership. That’s not the case here with 45% placement for people of color, mostly among performers and athletes, and 36% by women. One key female figure, Whoopi Goldberg, closed up her business, Whoopi & Maya, in 2020. Goldberg announced a new cannabis venture Emma & Clyde, named for her mother and brother, on 4/20.

Pot is hot and so are the stocks. Most of the celeb brands are private, though you can invest in the companies they partner with, like Canopy Growth or Cronos.

For some it’s good to know Nelson or Bob Marley’s family have put their seal of approval on commercial pot products. There certainly are enough of them with plenty more to come.

– Read the entire article at Variety.

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Birmingham, Alabama Mayor Randall Woodfin announced on Tuesday that blanket pardons would be issued for cannabis convictions going back more than 30 years, giving up to 15,000 people even more reason to celebrate on 4/20. And in another move by state leaders to mark the high holiday, the Alabama Democratic Party called on lawmakers to legalize cannabis for both medical and recreational use.

In a statement from Woodfin, the mayor noted that Birmingham kicked off a Pardons for Progress program in 2019 that was designed to make it easier to have past cannabis convictions pardoned and the records sealed. But those eligible for pardons were required to apply for the relief and only nine convictions have been cleared since the program’s inception.

Under the new plan announced by Woodfin on Tuesday, closed cases from 1990 through 2020 that resulted in a conviction for misdemeanor marijuana possession charges will be automatically pardoned. Cases still pending before the court would have to be closed before a pardon could be issued. The pardons, however, will not result in a reduction or refund of any fines or fees paid to the court.

Woodfin noted that

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On the eve of 4/20, members of Congress offered up a gift to the budding cannabis industry.

The House of Representatives on Monday passed the SAFE Banking Act of 2021, which clears the way for financial institutions and banks to work with cannabis companies.

The SAFE Banking Act of 2021 “generally prohibits a federal banking regulator from penalizing a depository institution for providing banking services to a legitimate cannabis-related business,” according to a summary of the legislation.

“Prohibited penalties include terminating or limiting the deposit insurance or share insurance of a depository institution solely because the institution provides financial services to a legitimate cannabis-related business and prohibiting or otherwise discouraging a depository institution from offering financial services to such a business,” the summary read. 

“Additionally, proceeds from a transaction involving activities of a legitimate cannabis-related business are not considered proceeds from unlawful activity. Proceeds from unlawful activity are subject to anti-money laundering laws. Furthermore, a depository institution is not, under federal law, liable or subject to asset forfeiture for providing a loan or other financial services to a legitimate cannabis-related business.” 

It continued: “The bill also provides that a federal banking agency may not request or order a depository institution to terminate a customer account

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Today is that hallowed cultural holiday for the cannabis industry, 4/20. Of all of the 4/20’s of the past, this one hits a little different (although 2015 was a nice year, too). We have seen so much political change in support of cannabis, including state-by-state legalization in the past year. We’ve also seen some fun, holiday-specific events– Colorado is awesomely auctioning off 4/20 festive license plates, and Adidas is having a 4/20 draw to be able to buy Towelie Superstars (yes, I registered for that drawing)).

Although you probably can’t gather in crowds to celebrate cannabis this year, here’s a list of the unique highlights to be thankful for this socially-distanced 4/20:

Democratic controlled Congress and White House

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you know that the Dems are now in control of Congress and the White House, which means that cannabis should finally get a fair shake at legalization (at least according to Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer). While President Biden has never supported legalization, he seems to now be fine with medical cannabis, and the Democrats also seem to be pretty bullish on getting some kind of cannabis legalization through Congress before the 2022 midterms.

The

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CANNABIS CULTURE – Liberty through street art. 

This is an article about what I think pot activists should do to honor the now-traditional April 20th day of cannabis celebration and protest, given that, in some places, there are a surging number of cases of COVID-19, and in some cases, more deadly variants circulating.

To understand the full nature of COVID-19 and the safety and efficacy of various proprietary and non-proprietary treatments, please check out these articles at Cannabis Culture and this show on Pot TV. 

https://www.cannabisculture.com/content/2020/03/30/covid-19-cannabis-herbal-medicine/

https://www.cannabisculture.com/content/2020/09/24/covid-19-cannabis-herbal-medicine-part-2-gain-of-function/

https://www.pot.tv/video/2020/11/12/sars-cov-2-natural-medicine-and-marijuana/

As a cannabis activist for 29 years who has studied the issue carefully, I have come to the conclusion that continued post-legalization prohibition of cannabis and over-regulation of industrial hemp threatens the existence of humanity, through climate destabilization by denying carbon-negative hemp ethanol the ability to compete with fossil fuels, by the brutality against (and – in some places – genocidal war against) the herbally autonomous, and by the crushing poverty enforced through the prohibition and/or cartelization of the cannabis economy. 

As activists, we have a duty to draw attention to these injustices in any effective way possible – even if it means risking arrest in acts of civil disobedience in order

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Many insiders believe “marijuana” is a term with racist roots, while others aren’t so high on calling it “weed.” But 4/20 will give us time to contemplate.

Planning on getting some pot to celebrate 4/20?

The cannabis industry is fully down with that, but many insiders have a special request: Don’t refer to it as “marijuana.”

Although that’s been the most popular name of the plant for a century, cannabis insiders, including Daniel Maida Hayden of Extractioneering.com, an Oregon-based pot brand, think it should be dumped.

– Read the entire article at Huff Post.

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Recommendations on Black-owned cannabis brands to enjoy and support.

It’s impossible to address the state of Black brands in cannabis without addressing the cruel and unjust impact of the War on Drugs in the United States. The criminalization of cannabis has ripped apart families and communities, and ruined individual lives. People of color are four times more likely than white people to be arrested on possession charges. A 2021 analysis by the National Organization for Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), for example, reported that Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) comprised 94 percent of cannabis-related arrests in 2020 in New York City.

– Read the entire article at Rolling Stone.

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A bill that would expand access to medical cannabis in public schools in Colorado was passed by the state House of Representatives on Tuesday and is now headed to the desk of Democratic Gov. Jared Polis. The measure, Senate Bill 21-056, was approved by members of the House with a vote of 57 to 6. Under the bill, children with complicated medical conditions would be able to receive cannabis-based medicines from school personnel while on campus.

If signed into law by Polis, the bill would help students access medical cannabis in public schools by requiring school districts to create policy “for the storage, possession, and administration of cannabis-based medicine by school personnel.” The Senate bill would also protect school personnel who elect to administer cannabis medicines to student patients, who must have a doctor’s treatment plan on file with the school. Cannabis medicines used by students under the measure must be in a non-smokable form.

Teen cannabis activist Alexis Bortell, who was instrumental in the bill’s passage, shared the news of the House vote in a Facebook post on Monday. Now 15, Bortell moved to Colorado with her family at

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And then, there were 50, with the newly codified Idaho hemp legalization.

On Friday, Idaho Gov. Brad Little signed House Bill 126, otherwise known as the “Industrial Hemp Research and Development Act.” Similar bills have passed in state legislatures across the country, ultimately earning the eager signature of their respective governors—a trend that was sparked by Congress’ passage of the 2018 Farm Bill. That bill legalized industrial hemp, paving the way for states to exploit what in recent years has emerged as a cash crop.

With Little’s signature on HB 126, that trend finally came to Idaho, which became the 50th state to legalize industrial hemp

Per the Associated Press, the “new law does not allow selling to Idaho consumers hemp products containing any amount of THC.”

Under the language of the bill, the director of the state’s department of agriculture “must prepare and submit a state plan as expeditiously as possible, but no later than September 1, 2021, to the secretary of agriculture in compliance with the 2018 farm bill and the rules promulgated thereunder.” 

“The state plan must be created in consultation with the governor, the director of the Idaho state police, and Idaho’s agricultural industry and must allow for the production, processing, transportation,

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