Maine Marijuana News

GARDINER, Maine (NEWS CENTER) – If you visit the city of Gardiner, you may notice a little less debris along the streets and sidewalks.

That’s because dozens of people spent a sunny Saturday collecting trash all over town.

The incentive? Free marijuana.

“Bring us back the full trash bag, and we give them a gift of cannabis,” said Dennis Meehan, owner of Summit Medical Marijuana in Gardiner.

He and his family are using their brand new business to clean up the community.

“[I heard of it in] Colorado – there was a town that did this,” said Meehan. “They had a great response to this. So I was hoping to do the same thing in Maine.”

How it works: grab a trash bag, fill it with trash from around town, return it to the store, and get your bag of marijuana free of charge.

Meehan says he knows it’s not a great business model to give away free things, but says he’s helping people. “Something that caregivers do all across Maine that

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The way Scott Eccleston looks at it, if a person can grow a tomato, he or she can grow marijuana.

“There’s a reason they call it ‘weed,’” Eccelston, the owner of Maine Seedlings and Clones in Biddeford, said. “Treat it like any other plant in your garden and it will grow.”

Last November voters approved a referendum that allows residents to grow marijuana plants for their own personal, recreational use.

According to the law itself, a resident must be 21-years-old to grow marijuana for his or her personal use. He or she can possess an unlimited amount of seeds, no more than 12 immature plants and no more than six flowering plants.

Growers can keep the entire harvest from their six flowering plants. Any indoor growing must be done in the grower’s own residence. Outside plants may be grown on the grower’s property on on a friend’s property with written permission from the property owner, according to the law.

All outdoor plants must not be visible other than from the air or by binoculars and all plants must be tagged

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We are a society that relies heavily on substances to make us feel and be better. As we work to end the stigma around addiction and aid those in recovery we need to reexamine our expectations and threshold for discomfort. That requires being open to less addictive substances and methods to reach comfort levels that enable us to function and enjoy life, not numb us. Unfortunately, there is stigma surrounding some alternatives.

My dad was the first of my family members to be diagnosed and die of cancer in the early 1990s. His final days were spent in a haze of morphine, administered by family or a hospice nurse. Between doses he had moments of lucidity but was in excruciating pain.

In the past decade, two brothers, my mother and both of my in-laws were diagnosed with cancer. The cancer types were different but the treatments were similar. Radiation, chemotherapy, targeted therapy and/or tumor removal. There were still prescription medications for pain: Dilaudid, OxyContin, oxycodone, fentanyl and Vicodin.

Those drugs were mostly successful

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By Keith Mansur
Oregon Cannabis Connection

Paul LePage, Maine’s simply crazy Governor, is easily the most ignorant, angry, racist, and buffoonish leader in America. His most recent comments on marijuana taxation are just the latest in a slew of incidents that have defined the governor’s two terms in office. I will admit he has some minor competition from the likes of Oklahoma’s Mary Fallin and New Jersey’s Chris Christie, but LePage takes the “Worst Governor” title with relative ease.

LePage really shines as a buffoon when it comes to cannabis policy and his statements over the past few years relating to the state’s legalization efforts and the existing medical marijuana program. Not to discount Mary Fallin’s reefer madness attitude on marijuana, LePage is even more ridiculous when it comes to his beliefs and positions.

Recently, LePage argued that medical marijuana, and the patients that use it, should be taxed right along with the state’s new adult-use cannabis, asserting that “It’s going to be devastating.” On July 19th, LePage spoke to the Rotary Club in Bar Harbor,

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Hollywood is on its way to becoming Hollyweed: The city of Lynwood is the first in Los Angeles County to start negotiating with licensees who would grow, manufacture, and deliver pot.

As the most populous county in the most populous state, Los Angeles is a major play as the cannabis industry gains a wider ability to sell the drug for recreational use. Voters in California — along with those in Nevada, Maine, and Massachusetts — legalized it in November. The $6 billion U.S. industry is expected to reach $50 billion by 2026, according to investment bank Cowen & Co.

Lynwood is kick-starting the momentum. Its city council, this week, granted preliminary approval to 13 applicants for commercial cannabis cultivation and manufacturing, according to a statement from the mayor. The groups each must negotiate individually with Lynwood on terms and conditions for their operations, and must demonstrate clean backgrounds and financial security.

“They are the first ones to be able to do this,” said Priscilla Vilchis, 30, who is seeking at least two licenses. “There are a lot of people watching.

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A bill that would require the Maine Department of Agriculture to test cannabis before it is sold to adults passed the House of Representatives 101-32, according to a Press Herald report. The vote follows a 17-0 vote by the special committee convened to hash out the state’s adult-use cannabis industry regulations.

The measure faces further votes in both the House and Senate and could be challenged by Gov. Paul LePage, who would rather put cannabis regulations in the hands of the Bureau of Alcoholic Beverages and Lottery Operations officials over the Agriculture Department, as required by the ballot measure approved by voters last November.

Opponents of the testing measure argued that the Department of Agriculture, which provides testing for dairy products and produce in the state, does not have the resources to also test cannabis. The fiscal note on the bill estimates cannabis testing would cost the state about $175,000 annually, but those costs would be covered by the taxes on recreational cannabis sales.

Portions of the voter-backed law have already taken effect, allowing adults 21-and-older to possess up to 2.5 ounces

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Hollywood is on its way to becoming Hollyweed: The city of Lynwood is the first in Los Angeles County to start negotiating with licensees who would grow, manufacture and deliver pot.

As the most populous county in the most populous state, Los Angeles is a major play as the cannabis industry gains a wider ability to sell the drug for recreational use. Voters in California — along with those in Nevada, Maine and Massachusetts — legalized it in November. The $6 billion U.S. industry is expected to reach $50 billion by 2026, according to investment bank Cowen & Co.

Lynwood is kick-starting the momentum. Its city council this week granted preliminary approval to 13 applicants for commercial cannabis cultivation and manufacturing, according to a statement from the mayor. The groups each must negotiate individually with Lynwood on terms and conditions for their operations, and must demonstrate clean backgrounds and financial security.

“They are the first ones to be able to do this,” said Priscilla Vilchis, 30, who is seeking at least two licenses. “There are a lot of people watching. If this

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Police departments across the state are coming to grips with how to deal with people caught possessing marijuana after New Hampshire became the 22nd state to decriminalize the drug on Tuesday.

Police departments throughout the Granite State have until Sept. 18, less than two months, to prepare for change in drug policy, with many law enforcement agencies expressing uncertainty of the steps they will take to deal with the change.

The law has some ambiguity, leaving questions like how to deal with someone in possession of differing marijuana products, or how to enforce driving under the influence of the drug.

“We’re trying to understand how it’s going to change court procedures and how it’s going to affect records management systems,” said Tuftonboro police Chief Andy Shagoury, the President of the New Hampshire Association of Chiefs of Police, which opposed by the bill.

Other police chiefs said they weren’t ready to talk about the changes to the law, or declined to comment altogether. A spokesman for the New Hampshire Department of Safety did not return phone calls or emails for comment.

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AUGUSTA — The Maine House overwhelmingly approved a bill Thursday that would require the state’s Department of Agriculture to set up testing facilities so it could test marijuana for safety before it is sold for recreational use.

The bill faces further votes in both the House and Senate, and will likely face the scrutiny of Republican Gov. Paul LePage, who has urged lawmakers to put the regulation of marijuana wholly in the hands of the state’s Bureau of Alcoholic Beverages and Lottery Operations, which oversees the state’s wholesale liquor business and its lottery games.

The bill, approved by the House on a 101-32 vote, is the first from a special select committee of the Legislature that was established to set up a regulatory regime for recreational marijuana, which was approved by voters at the ballot box last November.

While the voter-passed law already makes it legal for an adult 21 or over to possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana or to grow up to six marijuana plants, it also made the commercial sale of marijuana legal and lawmakers have

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