Maine Marijuana News

Over the last 10 years, however, Americans have come to embrace the idea of legal weed. Late last year, a record 64% of Americans told Gallup that marijuana should be made legal. That was equal to the percentage who thought same-sex marriage should be legal in Gallup’s 2017 polling. It was more than double the 31% who said marijuana should be legal in 2000. The percentage who thought marijuana should be made legal in 2017 was 52 percentage points higher than the only 12% who favored making marijuana legal when Gallup first asked the question in 1969. Much like the movement to make same-sex marriage legal, marijuana legalization has started at the state level. You can smoke a joint legally in a number of New England and western states. A big difference with the same-sex marriage movement, however, is that support for marijuana legalization isn’t just occurring within the Democratic base. Yes, Democrats are more likely to say that people should be able to smoke marijuana legally, but a significant percentage of Republicans feel

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April 20 marks the unofficial high holiday of stoner culture, when cannabis enthusiasts around the world celebrate the fine art of smoking pot (or eating it or vaping it or drinking it). This has been a huge year for marijuana legalization, and there are more places to legally light up on 4/20 than ever.

The origins of the term 420 (pronounced “four-twenty”) are a bit hazy. Urban myths swirled for years that 420 was California state penal code for marijuana use, or numbers from a Bob Dylan song multiplied, or even related to Hitler’s birthday. All wrong.

The best evidence points to a group of California high schoolers known as “The Waldos“ who in the early 1970s would meet up after school every day at 4:20pm to get high. The term was then picked up by Grateful Dead followers and spread globally with the help of counter-culture publications like High Times.

What was once a secret code in stoner circles is now so mainstream corporate brands get in on it. This year, Lyft is offering riders in states

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Fear of tax evasion is one reason Gov. Paul LePage wants to veto the adult-use cannabis bill.

The two-term Republican thinks Mainers who aren’t really sick will flock to the medical market because adult-use cannabis would be taxed at a higher rate – an effective tax rate of about 20 percent compared to medical’s 5.5 percent sales tax. LePage has worried that setting up two marijuana programs could lead to tax evasion and black market diversion since voters first legalized recreational marijuana in 2016. He cited it in his veto letter last year, when he scuttled the Legislature’s first adult-use market bill.

“The drafters of this bill chose to ignore the significant effects that this new program – one with different levels of regulatory oversight and a different tax structure – will have on the existing medical marijuana program, its patients and the public health and safety of the Maine people,” he wrote.

He warned lawmakers about “exploitation of loopholes in medical marijuana regulations to broaden the sales base for medical marijuana, which has a much lower tax rate,” and

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The governor has warned lawmakers against having different tax structures for medical and recreational use.

Fear of tax evasion is one reason Gov. Paul LePage wants to veto the adult-use cannabis bill.

The two-term Republican thinks Mainers who aren’t really sick will flock to the medical market because adult-use cannabis would be taxed at a higher rate – an effective tax rate of about 20 percent compared to medical’s 5.5 percent sales tax. LePage has worried that setting up two marijuana programs could lead to tax evasion and black market diversion since voters first legalized recreational marijuana in 2016. He cited it in his veto letter last year, when he scuttled the Legislature’s first adult-use market bill.

“The drafters of this bill chose to ignore the significant effects that this new program – one with different levels of regulatory oversight and a different tax structure – will have on the existing medical marijuana program, its patients and the public health and safety of the Maine people,” he wrote.

He warned lawmakers about “exploitation of loopholes in medical marijuana regulations to

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A bill to reform the state’s medical marijuana program appeared headed to Gov. Paul LePage on Wednesday.

The second major piece of cannabis legislation to pass both houses of the Legislature in as many days would expand the number of people who can qualify for a medical marijuana card, increase the number of state-licensed dispensaries and allow registered caregivers to see more patients, hire more workers and run storefront operations without the threat of legal reprisal. LePage has 10 days to act on the bill once it lands on his desk, although its supporters expect him to veto it.

The status of the bill and whether it needs additional enactment votes was unclear early Thursday, as lawmakers worked late into the night debating whether to extend the session. Enactment votes are procedural actions taken before a bill can advance to the governor.

The Senate voted 25-10 in favor of the bill on Wednesday. The proposal was approved by the House with ease on Friday, without debate or even a roll call.

“Years back, when I first encountered the idea of

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Acreage Holdings grabbed the cannabis industry’s attention when it announced former House Speaker (and longtime marijuana prohibitionist) John Boehner and former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld were joining its board of advisors on April 11.

“We couldn’t be more pleased and honored to have Speaker Boehner a part of our organization,” CEO Kevin Murphy (pictured left) tells Cannabis Business Times. “The reason for that is very simple—he’s a very pragmatic and a very smart man. He’s very well recognized in this country and beyond, but he also helps us help each other.”

Boehner and Weld are not lobbyists, Murphy says, but rather guides for the company. Not only do they understand how government works, but Boehner has business experience through his time as an entrepreneur and small business owner, while Weld acted as a senior law enforcement member at the U.S. Department of Justice prior to his years as a governor and has a background in private equity.

“They have a keen understanding of who’s doing what when and what motivates people in government to do what they do, and to

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GREENE — Shots were fired Wednesday morning on Park Lane when a homeowner, a licensed medical marijuana caregiver, confronted three men trying to break into his house.

Police said the three suspects fired blindly at the homeowner as they fled and that one of them may have shot himself in the foot.

No one was hurt in the 10 a.m. incident on the dead-end street off College Road near the Lewiston-Greene town line.

Investigators from the Androscoggin County Sheriff’s Office described it as an attempted home invasion. They said the attack followed an attempted break-in at the same home Tuesday night. Investigators said there was an attempted break-in there in October 2016. In that incident, three teens fled after being shot at by the homeowner. Police said the suspects had been trying to steal marijuana. The resident is a licensed marijuana caregiver.

Local, county and federal agents were investigating Wednesday’s incident.

Police said the drama began when the homeowner called to report seeing three men, through surveillance equipment, trying to break into his home.

The men were described as white,

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Lawmakers in Maine are confident they have the votes to override a likely veto by Gov. Paul LePage (R) on a bill legalizing recreational marijuana.

The state Senate on Tuesday passed the bill in a concurrence vote of 25-10; the House also approved it last week by a veto-proof margin. Legislators in the House believe their bloc of support for the bill will hold if the governor follows through on his promise to use a veto, according to the Portland Press Herald

LePage has said he will strike down the bill over concerns that legalizing an adult-use marijuana program would create a second set of regulations and taxes on the substance in addition to the state’s existing medical marijuana program. 

LePage has 10 days left to decide on the bill, which would likely allow the state to issue recreational marijuana licenses for businesses in the spring of next year. 

The state House also approved a bill Friday aimed at overhauling the medical marijuana program, allowing doctors to prescribe marijuana for any medical problem and lifting market restrictions on dispensaries.  

Maine’s neighboring state of New

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The Maine Legislature on Tuesday sent a bill to launch the adult-use marijuana market to Gov. Paul LePage.

The two-term Republican now has 10 days to take action. He can sign the bill, allow it to go into law without his signature, or use his gubernatorial veto to try to kill it, which is what he has vowed to do. LePage, a staunch opponent of marijuana, said he doesn’t want Maine to operate two different marijuana programs – medical and adult-use – with two different tax rates and two different sets of rules.

The legislation may soon be joined by another marijuana bill. The House on Friday approved a bill to overhaul the state’s medical marijuana program without debate or even a roll call vote. That bill is expected to come up for a vote in the Senate on Wednesday, the last day of the legislative session, which would send the second major marijuana bill to LePage’s desk in as many days.

The Senate’s vote Tuesday on final enactment of the recreational bill – 25-10, in favor – was a

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