Maine Marijuana News

Opportunism, innovation, creativity, entrepreneurship, first-mover, trendsetter, market expansionism, monopoly, vertical integration; these are some of the basic concepts of global business strategy implemented by corporations across the markets of the world. These are the strategies being implemented by the marijuana entrepreneurs that want to capitalize on the global expansion of this commodity. The emergence of a highly lucrative marijuana market forces us to further study the global-local (glocal) dynamics of this business, particularly when it comes to the United States and more precisely the State of Maine. It is inevitable to ask why our state continues to stubbornly insist on following the anti-Capitalist position of our federal government while other states and other nations become trendsetters and first-movers within an untapped market that could catapult the expansion of the global economy at a time of global stagnation.

It is clear by now that several market stakeholders have moved beyond the marijuana taboo, shifting toward regulation of a medical and recreational marijuana market that eliminates the advantages for the black market while exposing the commodity to the rules of the

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Hodgdon resident Sheila Murchie holds up a sign promoting free samples of marijuana during the Nov. 7 elections in Houlton. Murchie’s efforts were shut down by members of the U.S. Border Patrol after agents seized her marijuana. (Courtesy of Houlton Police Department)

Hodgdon resident Sheila Murchie holds up a sign promoting free samples of marijuana during the Nov. 7 elections in Houlton. Murchie’s efforts were shut down by members of the U.S. Border Patrol after agents seized her marijuana. (Courtesy of Houlton Police Department)

The seizure by U.S. Border Patrol agents of marijuana being handed out for free outside the polls in Houlton on Election Day, highlighted the dilemma faced by officers trying to enforce federal laws in a state where medical and recreational pot are now legal.

HOULTON, Maine — The seizure by U.S. Border Patrol agents of marijuana being handed out for free outside the polls in Houlton on Election Day, highlighted the dilemma faced by officers trying to enforce federal laws in a state where medical and recreational pot are now legal.

No one

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The Maine Municipal Association says members are getting increasing complaints about the smell of marijuana, an observation shared by some police departments.

In a report filed by WGME’s Marissa Bodnair, Augusta police said out of 20 marijuana-related calls so far in 2017, 13 have been about the odor. Lewiston police said their calls logs show more than 50.

The problem is especially acute in the dense neighborhoods of the city’s downtown, said Lewiston Lt. David St. Pierre.

Municipalities and landlords of rental units say the issue is complicated. Some municipal managers think land use rules could potentially address neighborhood odor complaints.

On the state level, a set of rules to regulate Maine’s new legal adult-use industry failed to win approval this fall after Gov. Paul LePage vetoed it and lawmakers failed to override the veto.

It’s unclear whether new efforts to regulate legal recreational marijuana will contain specific provisions related to nuisance odors.

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ELLSWORTH — When it comes to recreational marijuana in Maine, there are still a lot of unknowns.

That was the takeaway from a public forum on the subject held Nov. 15 at the General Bryant E. Moore Community Center in Ellsworth. Forty citizens attended.

“We’re in a place where we’re not sure what the next steps are going to be,” said Alysia Melnick, a lobbyist and attorney with the Portland law firm of Bernstein Shur. She was political director for last year’s successful campaign to legalize marijuana for recreational use in Maine.

That statewide vote legalized both personal use and businesses such as growing facilities, stores and social clubs that could sell marijuana. The personal use provision has already gone into effect.

The Legislature delayed, however, allowing any marijuana businesses to open until at least February of 2018 while it worked to amend the law passed by voters and create specific rules to regulate such businesses.

An attempt to do that failed earlier this month when Governor Paul LePage vetoed a bill passed by the Legislature. That leaves in place

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Each election year, more U.S. states have chosen to chip away at cannabis prohibition. Last November alone, California, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada legalized cannabis for recreational use—bringing the total number of “full legalization” states to eight: Alaska, California, Colorado, Massachusetts, Maine, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, plus Washington, D.C.

Many more—29 states and D.C.—allow cannabis for medical use. 

The use of ballot initiatives has made the slow death of cannabis prohibition possible—and according to a new analysis by 24/7 Wall Street, this process will shape future legalization efforts as well. 

24/7 Wall Street, a partner of USA Today, compiled a list of 15 states that appear to have the best chance at being the next to legalize it. 

Many of them will rely on ballot initiatives to get it done: citizens collect a certain number of signatures (depending on the state) to qualify their proposal for the ballot. Come election day, the public is given the opportunity to vote on the ballot initiative. 

According to Ballotpedia, 21 U.S. states allow citizens to put up their own ballot initiatives for a public vote. 

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Love it or hate it, the odor of marijuana is unmistakable and some say there’s more of it wafting through the air since the drug was legalized for recreational use last year.

STATEWIDE (WGME) — Love it or hate it, the odor of marijuana is unmistakable and some say there’s more of it wafting through the air since the drug was legalized for recreational use last year.

“You smell it anywhere you go today,” said Mike Heon of Lewiston.

“It’s definitely more obvious now that it got passed,” added Ben Bernier, as he walked through Portland’s Monument Square.

According to the Maine Municipal Association, it’s one of the most common complaints about pot, and several police departments agreed.

In Augusta, police said out of 20 marijuana-related calls so far in 2017, 13 have been

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BOSTON (AP) — A growing number of Massachusetts communities are leaving their borders open to commercial marijuana businesses, bucking a wave of bans and moratoriums that followed voter approval of legal recreational cannabis.

Recent votes in several cities and towns against prohibitions on retail marijuana shops have cheered advocates for the nascent cannabis industry who say it could signal that communities around the state are slowly concluding that potential benefits, including a boost in tax revenues and the driving out of illegal dealers, outweigh the drawbacks of welcoming such businesses to town.

“We got a lot of support from people who don’t use cannabis, but might want to someday,” said Scott Winters, a resident of Amesbury who spearheaded opposition to an anti-cannabis referendum that was defeated by a nearly 2-1 margin Nov. 7. “From users to non-users to just folks who want revenue for the city, we had a lot of support.”

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Election 2017: Legalization Candidates and Measures Win Big

Town meetings in Dracut, Marshfield and the Cape Cod town of Brewster have

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AUGUSTA — Medical marijuana caregivers say Maine’s new program rules may not be as bad – or require as much work to follow – as they had initially feared.

Some caregivers say the new rules may even help the industry by legitimizing certain practices that were once considered legally murky, like patient cycling, a method by which they can increase the number of patients they treat.

“As scary as it is having new rules imposed on us, things really aren’t changing that much,” said Catherine Lewis of Medical Marijuana Caregivers of Maine. “There were actually some positive changes.”

Lewis led a two-hour workshop on the rules for about 125 caregivers in Augusta on Saturday. The rules came out two weeks ago but won’t go into effect until February.

The discussion came as Maine still struggles to implement an initiative approved by voters a year ago to legalize the recreational use of marijuana. The Maine House voted Nov. 6 to sustain Gov. Paul LePage’s veto of a bill that would create the legal framework for retail sales of recreational marijuana. The

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Thursday, November 16, 2017

On November 3, 2017, Maine Governor Paul LePage announced that he had vetoed a bill sent to his desk with tepid support that would have taxed and regulated the commercial sale of recreational marijuana. The veto prolongs a somewhat odd state of affairs in Maine in which Mainers may legally possess and cultivate recreational marijuana for personal use, but the commercial sale of recreational pot has yet to be authorized. Accordingly, so-called “pot shops” have not been allowed to open in the state. In November of 2016, Maine voters approved a recreational marijuana ballot initiative that legalized the possession of up to 2.5 ounces of recreational marijuana by residents 21 years of age or older, as well as the cultivation of up to six adult marijuana plants for personal use. The ballot initiative also approved the commercial sale of recreational marijuana, but Maine’s legislature has yet to allow that to happen.

The recently vetoed

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AMESBURY — A Maine man faces drug distribution charges after he handed over almost 3 pounds of marijuana and a THC concentrate labeled “Dab Daddy Extracts” to a state trooper following a traffic stop on Interstate 495. 

Timothy Taylor, 33, of Old Town, Maine, was also charged with possession of psychedelic mushrooms (a Class C substance), Xanax (a Class E substance) and marked lanes. 

At Taylor’s arraignment Wednesday in Newburyport District Court, he was ordered held on the $960 cash bail already posted. He is due back in court Dec. 22 for a pretrial hearing. 

It was shortly after 1 a.m. on Wednesday when Trooper Christopher Ryan noticed Taylor’s vehicle cross into another lane, almost striking another while traveling on I-495 south, according to a police report. 

After pulling Taylor’s car over, Ryan noticed an extremely strong odor of fresh marijuana coming from the vehicle.

Ryan asked Taylor if he had marijuana in the car and, without hesitation, Taylor showed him a small pouch of marijuana and a larger yellow envelope containing several packages of “Dab Daddy Extracts.”

Ryan asked if

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